What happened in Kerry this week

Rose of Tralee escorts were put through their paces at the weekend as they hauled tractor tyres across obstacle courses, battled against the rising tide of Tralee Bay and raced across broken glass – all to encourage team spirit ahead of the world famous festival this August.

If Kerry are to reach the All-Ireland Final this year for the third year in a row, it could cost a family of four up to €1,000 to attend the football showpiece.

One of the longest serving priests in Kerry is looking forward to the Church’s next phase – when digital technology will be used in how it ministers to its people.

The abandoned dog crisis in Kerry has been described as ‘mind-blowing’ and ‘dismal’ by two leading animal welfare volunteers in the county.

A Listowel man whose father was killed in a hit and run in 1972 is pleading with Kerry County Council to install road markings and lights so he can safely cross the very same road – 52 years after the tragedy.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.



Nun better for this Tralee restoration!

A SWISS NUN based in Slovakia has begun a full restoration of Tralee’s Our Lady of Fatima statue at the Dominican Church –76 years after it first arrived in Kerry.

A huge devotion to The Virgin Mary –who supposedly appeared before three peasant children in Fatima, Portugal in 1917 – has made the Tralee statue hugely popular amongst Catholics, inspiring many pilgrimages and community projects in her name.

Sister Gabriela arrived in Tralee last week after being convinced by local priest Fr David McGovern to carry out much needed restoration works, and already she’s loving Tralee.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.



All-Ireland Final could cost family €1,000

IF Kerry are to reach the All-Ireland Final this year for the third year in a row, it could cost a family of four up to €1,000 to attend the football showpiece.

This comes after the GAA have increased the price for stand tickets to July's All-Ireland senior finals from €90 to €100.

It will now cost €100 to sit in the stand and watch the All-Ireland Senior Football or Hurling Final in Croke Park. For a family with two kids, that's €400; there's no concession for kids or OAPs.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.



Former Kerry player reveals Lyme ordeal

A former Kerry footballer this week revealed how he had to sell his family home to fund treatment in the US for Lyme disease.

Anthony Morris said that the rare disease has impacted his life for 17 years, and told a conference in Tralee that he also had to give up his career as a civil engineer due to the impact of Lyme. 

The Spa man was speaking at an event at MTU on Monday at which people in Kerry living with rare, life-changing diseases shared their experiences as part of a bid to help drive change for access to medication and adequate healthcare.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.



Fr Patsy marks Golden Jubilee

ONE OF the longest serving priests in Kerry is looking forward to the Church’s next phase –when digital technology will be used in how it ministers to its people.

Fr Patsy Lynch, who celebrated his Golden Jubilee on Sunday, has been championing technology in his Ballinskelligs Prior parish in South Kerry since the onslaught of the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020.

Four years later, he says he’s still surprised by the Church’s reluctance to embrace technology and use it as a tool.

“An American writer, James Emery White, has written a book about the ‘Hybrid Church’ that combines the physical with the digital and I also believe this is the way forward,” Fr Patsy told Kerry’s Eye.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.



Pressure mounts on Kerry farmers

KERRY FARMERS are being forced to decide between renting more fields or reducing their herd size to comply with new EU regulations.

Under the new Nitrates Action Programme (NAP) for 2024, farmers must not exceed 170kg of nitrogen per hectare (N/ha) in a year in the form of animal excretion, or organic fertiliser application in the form of slurry or farmyard manure.

Along with existing restrictions such as the time period allowed for spreading slurry, ploughing and applying chemical herbicides, the latest version of NAS seeks to further curb intensive farming on Irish land, thereby improving water quality in rivers and lakes.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.



Tralee shed offers social lifeline to local women

TRUE FRIENDSHIPS are blossoming this morning (Thursday) as the Phoenix Women’s Shed in Tralee celebrate their second anniversary –and offer a social lifeline to those seeking company across Kerry.

More than 50 women from across Tralee, Killarney, Listowel and Castleisland were expected at the Tralee Pipe Band Hall this morning for a good chinwag, some craic agus ceol, highlighting the importance of staying connected after retirement, bereavement and the joyful years of motherhood.

Just last week, the hearty crew gathered at The Rose Hotel in Tralee for a lively coffee morning, before strolling out to Tralee Bay Wetlands to enjoy the scenery.

Read the full story in Kerry’s Eye Digital Edition.